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Com Chien / Fried Rice
Fried rice is made from steamed rice stir-fried in a wok, often with other ingredients, such as eggs, vegetables, and meat. It is sometimes served as the penultimate dish in Chinese banquets (just before dessert). As a home-cooked dish, fried rice typically is made with leftover ingredients from other dishes, leading to countless variation   view...
Kho To / Clay Pot
Clay pot cooking is a technique of cooking food in an unglazed clay pot which has been soaked in water so as to release steam during the cooking process. This technique has a long history, stretching back at least to ancient Roman times, and is commonly used in several cuisines in Africa, Europe and Southeast and East Asia   view...
Canh Chua va Lau / Hot And Sour Soup
Canh chua (literally "sour soup")[1] is a sour soup indigenous to the Mekong Delta region of southern Vietnam. It is typically made with fish from the Mekong River Delta, pineapple, tomatoes (and sometimes also other vegetables such as okra or bạc hà), and bean sprouts, in a tamarind-flavored broth. It is garnished with the lemony-scented herb ngò ôm (Limnophila aromatica), caramelized garlic, and chopped scallions, as well as other herbs, according to the specific variety of canh chua; these other herbs may include rau răm (Vietnamese coriander), ngò gai (long coriander), and rau quế (Thai basil). It can be served alone, with white rice, or with rice vermicelli. The sour taste of the soup comes from tamarind, which is mixed with a small amount of hot water; the mixture is then stirred for a few moments to release all the essence, and the liquid (minus the tamarind seeds and other solids, which are discarded) is then added to the soup. When made in style of a hot pot, canh chua is called lẩu canh chua   view...
Goi / Vietnamese Salads
Goi is a generic term for “salad” in Vietnamese. But typically it does not include lettuce like most traditional western salads. And just like the term “banh,” there are numerous different types of goi using different veggies, for example, goi ngo sen (lotus root), goi bap cai (cabbage), goi buoi (pomelo), goi du du (papaya), and goi bap chuoi (banana flower) to just name a few. Goi can also be name for the type of protein it contains, for example, goi ga (chicken), goi vit (duck), etc. What is almost a constant, however, is the dressing. Most are dressed with the familiar fish sauce based dressing, similar to the nuoc mam cham, but slightly more tart with additional lime. The salad goi is also different from goi cuon which is the term for spring/summer roll–not sure why, but perhaps there is lettuce and other veggies wrapped inside. What is different about this particular salad we present today is that the veggies are first “brined” so to speak in salt, wilting it, but still leaving a great crunch   view...
Do Xao / House Special Stir Fried
A plate of Vietnamese Stir Fried Vegetables (Rau Xao) is a great accompaniment to any Southeast Asian meal, which usually consists of a soup, a main course, some rice and a plate of stir fried vegetables. Add some meat or seafood to the vegetables and the dish becomes a complete meal when served with some rice – easy to prepare and perfect for days when work takes a toll. If you are a vegetarian, omit the fish sauce and add some tofu instead of meat   view...