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Khai Vi / Appetizers
The Vietnamese are keen snackers. This scrumptious snacks are commonly available throughout the day on every street corner. People stop when they are hungry or when they see and smell something irresistible. They will sit down on a small stool or bench, by a rickety table set up on the pavement, and wait for their sizzling pancake or whatever it is to be cooked for them. The southern city of Saigon is abuzz with the sounds and sights of culinary activity, and the streets are so enticingly thick with cooking aromas you could almost bite the air. One of the first words you are likely learn in Vietnam is banh. It is simply used to describe sweet snacks - from spring rolls and crepes to sandwiches and rice cakes wrapped in banana leaves. You will find them everywhere, piles into baskets, stacked on counters and cooking over charcoal. Sweet or savory, the one thing banh have in common is that they are eaten with fingers. However, they are just the thing when you want new ideas for party nibbles, picnics or barbecue food or just a late night snack   view...
Pho / Beef Soup
Who doesn't love noodles soup? In the Vietnamese repertoire, beef pho noodle soup is a classic. In fact, it's practically the national dish of Vietnam. Below is my family's recipe for the quintessential Vietnamese food -- pho noodle soup. You may have had bowls of pho in Vietnamese noodle shops, in Vietnam and abroad. but have you made some yourself? Before leaping into this beef pho noodle soup recipe, check out Pho Secrets and Techniques post for a primer on bones, charring the onion, saving some fat, etc. Also, read about the history and evolution of pho in Vietnam and America. Making pho noodle soup takes time but most of it is passive cooking. And remember, you can freeze pho broth for future bowls of steamy hot pho noodle soup   view...
Hu Tieu va Mi / Clear Rice And Egg Noodle
Compared to pho from the North, or bun bo Hue from the central region, hu tieu can be downright confusing because there are many versions of it. At its core, hu tieu (pronounced "hoo tee-u") signals a Chinese-Southeast Asian style noodle soup made with a pork bone broth and no fish sauce. But that's where simplicity ends. The noodles in a bowl of hu tieu can be chewy clear tapioca noodles, opaque white rice noodles like you'd use for pho noodle soup, or thin Chinese egg noodles (mi). The toppings cover a wide territory, and may include boneless pork, pork ribs, pork offal, shrimp, squid, wonton dumplings, fried garlic, fried shallot, and/or scallion. As usual, you pick and choose whatever you want. Hu tieu is the extreme have-it-your-way Vietnamese food experience. I've seen a 'dry' version too but have never tried it   view...
Bun / Vermicelli
Rice vermicelli are thin noodles made from rice and are a form of rice noodles.[1] They are sometimes referred to as rice noodles or rice sticks, but they should not be confused with cellophane noodles, which is another type of vermicelli   view...
Banh Pho Xao / Stir Fried Rice Noodles
Available in small, medium, and large widths, banh pho noodles are available dried and fresh. The dried variety, technically called banh pho kho, is easier to find cooks up to a terrific chewy texture that’s nearly as good as fresh. Keep several fourteen- or sixteen-ounce packages of each width in the pantry to make noodle dishes on demand. If the sizes are not printed on the packaging, think of the noodles as Italian pasta   view...